The following is taken from

Murray, Andrew. The Key to the Missionary Problem. London: J. Nisbet & Co., 1902.


Dr. Pentecost opened with these words—

To the pastor belongs the privilege and the responsibility of solving the foreign missionary problem. Until the pastors of our Churches wake up to the truth of this proposition, and the foreign work becomes a passion in their own hearts and consciences, our Boards may do what they can, by way of devising forward movements or organising new methods for exploiting the Churches for money, yet the chariot wheels of foreign missions will drive heavily.”

He then went on to prove that every pastor holds his office under Christ’s commission, and can only fulfil it when,

“As a missionary bishop, he counts the whole world his fold.

The pastor of the smallest church has the power to make his influence felt around the world.

No pastor is worthy of his office who does not put himself into sympathy with the magnificent breadth of the great commission, and draw inspiration and zeal from its world-wide sweep.

The pastor is not only the instructor, but the leader of his congregation.

He must not only care for their souls, but direct their activities.

If there are churches that give not and pray not for foreign missions, it is because they have pastors who are false and recreant to the command of Christ.

I am almost warranted in saying that, as no congregation can long resist the enthusiasm of a really enthusiastic pastor, so, on the other hand, no congregation can rise above cold indifference or lack of conviction on this matter on the part of the pastor.”

The address closed with the sentence with which it began—

“To the pastor belongs the privilege and the responsibility of solving the foreign missionary problem.”